Tag Archives: Tyenna Peak

Tyenna Peak

We had previously attempted to summit Tyenna during a winter walk to Florentine Peak; however, we hadn’t anticipated the amount of snow that day and were forced to turn back at Florentine so that we wouldn’t be walking in the dark. This time we thought we would do it as part of a circuit, beginning at Wombat Moor then heading up to Tyenna from Lake Belton, before returning via K-Col and the Rodway Range.

The track begins on duckboards across Wombat Moor – also called the Moorland Walk – which is a very short walk that has some placards with information about the local flora. Shortly after, the duckboards disappear and you reach a slightly muddy track that has become a watercourse. We were pleased to see a lot of pink, white, red and orange scoparia, a nice change from the variations of yellow that were abundant on the Ben Lomond Plateau a few weeks earlier. You then leave the moor as the track heads west up through snow gum forest to a small saddle below Mt Mawson. There are good views of Mt Mueller and the Needles before dropping down into the subalpine forest around the Humboldt River. The track down to the river was in surprisingly good condition, and I believe this is thanks to the Friends of Mt Field,  who do a lot of great work all around the Mt Field NP.

Once we reached the Humboldt River the track quickly became a muddy, and sometimes scrubby pad through button grass plains. We reached the hut in just under 2 hours, where we had a snack and admired the recent renovations carried out by the Friends of Mt Field. We had a quick look at the lake before backtracking to the small signpost near the beginning of the buttongrass section (see photos). This sign is also the start of the overgrown pad to Lake Belton. The pad climbs for a bit, before levelling out and skirting some nice small tarns just before Lake Belton. It took only 25 minutes to reach the lake from the sign, and we stopped briefly on the shores to take in the nice view and to refuel before finding a way through the forest to Tyenna Peak. From the lake we were able to scope out what appeared to be a good route up, and ultimately we were able to follow scree all the way to the top with only a very short section of scrub.

Lunch was had sitting on top of Tyenna, 60 minutes after leaving Lake Belton. The position of this peak provides a unique vantage point of the impressive Mt Field cirque as well as number of mountains within the SWNP. We then pushed onwards towards K-Col to continue our circuit around to Lake Dobson. The plateau between Tyenna and Floretine was very pleasant, with large patches of flowering scoparia, other native blooms and cushion plants surrounding alpine tarns. The only sign of other walkers that day was a tent in the bushes around Clemes Tarn, presumably there to check out the floral display. Having done the leg between K-Col and Lake Dobson a number of times now there wasn’t much need to stop and take photos. We reached Lake Dobson 1 hour and 45 minutes after leaving K-Col hut, and made our way back down the road for about 2kms to the car at Wombat Moor.

All up 21.9kms in 8hours and 18 minutes with 1052m ascent.

Getting there: The Wombat Moor carpark is on the left hand side ~2kms before Lake Dobson.

GPS track
Wombat Moor
Looking North
Forest before the saddle
Looking towards Mt Mueller
A large scoparia branch
Crossing the Humboldt on a slippery log
Boggy track and the sign (left to Lake Belton)
Tarns in the buttongrass
Lake Belcher Hut
Inside – new walls and well looked after
Lake Belcher
Tarns before Lake Belton
Lake Belton
Lake Belton panorama
Pandani family on the scree
Lake Belton from higher up
Looking towards Snowy Range from Tyenna Peak
Looking at Mt Floretine from Tyenna Peak
Alpine gardens
richea scoparia
Looking towards Mt Field West
The tarn shelf
Snow gum